Student-to-Student AP Computer Science Advice

June 17, 2010 at 8:32 am 4 comments

Hélène Martin asked her outgoing AP CS class to give advice to the next class, and they came up with a terrific list.  Here’s only the first one, my favorite — especially the interaction between “tenets” #1 and #5.

The Five Tenets of Programming1. If you feel like you’re falling behind, ask for help, if not from Ms. Martin, then from other students.  You’ll save yourself hours of frustration.2. Don’t be afraid to try your own thing if you get the chance, even if you think it’s beyond your level.  You’ll learn faster if you’re interested in the project.3. Temp variables are awesome.  So are ArrayLists.4. Don’t let the sometimes snooty programming club people argue with you — by the end of the year, you’ll probably know more.5. And NEVER tell yourself you’re bad at coding.  EVER.  This just leads to failure.  See tenant 1.

via AP Computer Science Advice | Hélène Martin.

Entry filed under: Uncategorized. Tags: , .

Studying Engineering before they can spell it How important is a “useful” language for non-majors?

4 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Greg Wilson  |  June 17, 2010 at 11:47 am

    I presume that should be “tenets”, not “tenants”? 🙂

    Reply
  • 2. Hélène Martin  |  June 17, 2010 at 3:24 pm

    Thanks for posting, Mark, and for the spelling fix, Greg! I copied everyone’s verbatim and didn’t notice the spelling slip. Whoops. To be fair, it was extra credit on a quiz, so they were going fast! I’m going to silently change it on my blog to protect the innocent.

    Reply
  • 3. Alex Rudnick  |  June 18, 2010 at 9:14 am

    😀

    Advice for the ages. Especially about ArrayLists.

    Reply
  • 4. ali0482  |  August 14, 2010 at 1:11 pm

    The Five Tenets of Programming1. If you feel like you’re falling behind, ask for help, if not from Ms. Martin, then from other students. You’ll save yourself hours of frustration.2. Don’t be afraid to try your own thing if you get the chance, even if you think it’s beyond your level. You’ll learn faster if you’re interested in the project.3.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 9,004 other followers

Feeds

Recent Posts

Blog Stats

  • 1,876,342 hits
June 2010
M T W T F S S
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

CS Teaching Tips


%d bloggers like this: