It’s not chronic poverty that hurts education — it’s the large percentage with any poverty

July 22, 2011 at 9:55 am 6 comments

This study says that few children suffer chronic poverty, but way too many students face some poverty. And that’s enough to inhibit their development. Poverty is by far the most significant factor influencing students’ educational development. The pervasiveness of poverty, not its chronic nature, is a significant problem for our society.

Child poverty and economic hardship can have significant consequences for children’s development and life chances. Growing up in poverty can be harmful to children’s cognitive development and ability to succeed in school, to their social and emotional well-being, and to their health. Children who experience hardship when they are young and children who live in persistent and severe poverty are at the greatest risk. Moreover, child poverty costs our society an estimated $500 billion a year in lost productivity and increased spending on health care and the criminal justice system.

We find that although only a small share of children experience persistent, chronic poverty, children who do are much more likely to be poor as adults. We also find that African-American children are more likely than white children to experience poverty, and even when they spend similar amounts of time living in poverty during childhood, they are more likely to be poor as adults. We conclude by making policy recommendations for improving the life chances of children who grow up in poverty by both increasing family income in the short-term and mitigating the impact of poverty on child outcomes.

via NCCP | Child Poverty and Intergenerational Mobility.

Entry filed under: Uncategorized. Tags: .

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6 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Alan Fekete  |  July 22, 2011 at 5:26 pm

    Mark, Please indicate scope in posts like this – the study is only about the USA (and indeed, only about white and African-American communities within the USA). These issues vary enormously between nations – I believe that many European countries have quite good social safety nets, for example, so similar conclusions may not apply there.

    Reply
  • 2. Guest  |  July 26, 2011 at 3:15 pm

    Wait, isn’t poverty a relative measure? SO, if these children are still poor relative to others, does this have an effect on their educational outcomes… Moreover, if we can treat poverty as a binary factor–child has some poverty, child has no poverty, then why is the magnitude of the poverty of a given child not a factor?

    Moreover, poverty is typically symptom of other problems, like the inherent culture of the poor and the comorbidities associated with poverty (ppor health, lack of opportunity, etc). are these ate all considered in this analysis.

    Reply
  • 3. Guest  |  July 26, 2011 at 3:21 pm

    I also love when people have opinions about poor black people–“African-American children are more likely than white children to experience poverty, and even when they spend similar amounts of time living in poverty during childhood, they are more likely to be poor as adults.”

    Again, there are so many factors contributing poverty in African American communities.–Please explain to me again why our black president is having trouble raising the debt ceiling? It’s not just the poverty, it’s all of the externalities associated with being black that hinder progress–Additionally, blacks have only had equal access to education for the past 60 years (in legal terms)–some schools weren’t desegregated until 1975–many schools in poor communities are still segregated (for reasons yet unaddressed).

    Reply
  • 4. Guest  |  July 27, 2011 at 10:17 pm

    Also, my previous posts were riddled with misspellings because the page wouldn’t fully load the dialog box in the browser I was using…

    Reply
  • 5. Poverty | -Help Starts Young- «  |  August 16, 2011 at 6:30 am

    […] It’s not chronic poverty that hurts education – it’s the large percentage with any… (computinged.wordpress.com) Eco World Content From Across The Internet. Featured on EcoPressed Green Laptops: Going Eco-Friendly on the Road Rate this: Like this:LikeWees de eerste om post te waarderen. […]

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  • […] I’d make the same claim. Even the greatest teacher can be stymied by a class of poor and starving students, and even the greatest textbook can be completely ineffective with an unprepared teacher and […]

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