Be What’s Next! – A sentiment to drive computing education

May 31, 2012 at 7:15 am Leave a comment

I liked Alfred’s sentiment in this post: “Be what’s next!” The issues around my BLS post remind me of this idea. We don’t want to give up on what we have always done, because we want to retain those outcomes. But what if those outcomes are less useful today? “Be what’s next!”

Grace Hopper used to tell her audiences that if they ever used “because we have always done it this way” as an excuse for anything that she would magically appear next to them to “haunt” them. I first heard her say that some 40 years ago and it has stuck with me since then. And yet people do use that as an excuse. Oh they may say it differently but that is what they often mean. In computer science education all too often people believe that because they learned computer science some way that everyone should learn it that way. It’s not as bad as it used to be but at times I wonder if people are just saying it differently. For example “we use command line application programming because we don’t want students getting too wrapped up in GUI stuff.” Or perhaps “we need students to use text editors and command line compilers so that the really understand what is going on.” Baloney I say. Use modern tools and let students create applications that are real looking and relevant to them. In the long run this will be more incentive to learn more than anything else.

via Be What’s Next! – Computer Science Teacher – Thoughts and Information from Alfred Thompson – Site Home – MSDN Blogs.

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CalArts Awarded National Science Foundation Grant to Teach Computer Science through the Arts | CalArts What do non-programming designers have to know? | Janet H. Murray’s Blog on Inventing the Medium

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