Archive for May 26, 2014

A stunningly beautiful connection between music and computing: Jason Freeman’s “Grow Old”

My eldest child graduated from college this last year, and I’m feeling my first half-century these days.  That may be why I was particularly struck by the themes in Jason Freeman’s beautiful new work.  I recommend visiting and reading the page, and you’ll get why this is so cool, even before you listen to the music.  It’s not live coding — it’s kind of the opposite.  It’s another great example of using music to motivate the learning of computing.

Why can’t my music grow old with me?

Why does a recording sound exactly the same every time I listen to it? That makes sense when recordings are frozen in time on wax cylinders or vinyl or compact discs. But most of the music I listen to these days comes from a cloud-based streaming music service, and those digital 1s and 0s are streamed pretty much the same way every time.

In this world of infinitely malleable, movable bits, why must the music always stay the same? From day to day and year to year, I change. I bring new perspectives and experiences to the music I hear. Can my music change with me?

This streaming EP is my attempt to answer these questions. Once a day, a simple computer program recreates each track. From one day to the next, the changes in each track are usually quite subtle, and you may not even notice a difference. But over longer periods of time — weeks, months, or years — the changes become more substantial. So when you return to this music after a hiatus, then it, like you, will have changed.

via Jason Freeman: Grow Old.

May 26, 2014 at 8:25 am 1 comment


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