Where do K-12 policy decisions get made in US states?

August 20, 2014 at 8:18 am 4 comments

As I talked about in my NCWIT Summit Flash talk, the second step in changing a state’s K-12 computing education policy is figuring out where you are and how you move K-12 in your state.

Rick Adrion found a terrific set of resources that help to get a handle on what’s going on in each state.

Resources like these make it more clear why efforts like NGSS and Common Core are in trouble.  In quite a few states, most decisions are pushed down to the district level.  If states aren’t willing to make decisions for their whole state, how could they even consider requiring national standards?

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4 Comments Add your own

  • 1. alanone1  |  August 20, 2014 at 9:19 am

    “If states aren’t willing to make decisions for their whole state, how could they even consider requiring national standards?”

    If countries aren’t willing to make decisions for their whole country, how could they even consider requiring national standards?

    ????

    Reply
  • 2. Yves  |  August 20, 2014 at 2:34 pm

    In California, the power actually resides with the UC / CSU systems, which decide their a-g entrance requirements. Districts do have a lot of power to set graduation requirements, but they communicate the UC / CSU requirements to students and align with them so that their college-bound students are eligible for state schools.

    Reply
  • 3. Mike Zamansky (@zamansky)  |  August 20, 2014 at 7:58 pm

    Reading the title of your post the only thing I could think was “anywhere except in K-12 schools.”😦

    Reply
  • 4. Bonnie  |  August 27, 2014 at 9:52 am

    It was done at the state level here in NY, but there has been tremendous pushback by teachers, who are enlisting parents to fight against the standards. The most common reason given is “Common Core is too hard for the kids”. I am not happy because my district’s curriculum improved a lot when they went to Common Core, especially in math.

    Reply

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