Archive for January 20, 2017

A review of one of my favorite papers: Cognitive Apprenticeship (Collins, Brown, Newman)

I drew on Cognitive Apprenticeship a lot in my dissertation — so much so that Carl Berger asked me at my proposal, “Are you testing Cognitive Apprenticeship as a model?”  I had no idea how to respond, and 25 years later, I still don’t.  How do you test a conceptual framework?

Cognitive apprenticeship, like situated learning, starts from the assumption that apprenticeship is a particularly effective form of education. Then it asks, “How do you offer an apprenticeship around invisible tasks?”

What I like about the essay linked below is that it places cognitive apprenticeship in a broader context.  Apprenticeship isn’t always the best option (as discussed in the post about the Herb Simon paper).

Active listeners or readers, who test their understanding and pursue the issues that are raised in their minds, learn things that apprenticeship can never teach. To the degree that readers or listeners are passive, however, they will not learn as much as they would by apprenticeship, because apprenticeship forces them to use their knowledge. Moreover, few people learn to be active readers and listeners on their own, and that is where cognitive apprenticeship is critical–observing the processes by which an expert listener or reader thinks and practicing these skills under the guidance of the expert can teach students to learn on their own more skillfully.

Source: Cognitive Apprenticeship (Collins, Brown, Newman) | Reading for Pleasure

January 20, 2017 at 7:03 am Leave a comment


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