Archive for April 3, 2017

Elementary School Computer Science – Misconceptions and Developmental Progressions: Papers from SIGCSE 2017

March 8-11, Seattle hosted the ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium for 2017. This was the largest SIGCSE ever, with over 1500 attendees. I was there and stayed busy (as I described here). This post isn’t a trip report. I want to talk about two of my favorite papers (and one disappointing one) that I’ve read so far.

We are starting to gather evidence on what makes elementary school computer science different than undergraduate computer science. Most of our research on learning programming and computer science is from undergraduates, published in SIGCSE venues. We know relatively little about elementary school students, and it’s obvious that it’s going to be different. But how?

Shuchi Grover and Satabdi Basu of SRI are starting to answer that question in their paper “Measuring Student Learning in Introductory Block-Based Programming: Examining Misconceptions of Loops, Variables, and Boolean Logic.” They looked at the problems that 6th, 7th, and 8th graders had when programming in Scratch. They’re reporting on things that I’ve never heard of before as misconceptions at the undergraduate level. Like this quote:

Students harbored the misconception that a variable is a letter that is used as a short form for an unknown number – an idea that comes from middle school mathematics classes. Together, this led students to believe that repeat(NumberOfTimes) was a new command. One student conjectured it was a command for multiplication by 5 (the value of NumberOfTimes), while another thought it would print each number five times… After being told that NumberOfTimes was indeed a variable, the students could correctly predict the program output, though they continued to take issue with the length of the variable name.

I find their description believable and fascinating. Their paper made me realize that middle school students are expending cognitive load on issues like multi-character variable names that probably no computer scientist even considered. That’s a real problem, but probably fixable — though the fix might be in the mathematics classes, as well as in the CS classes.

The paper that most impressed me was from Diana Franklin’s group, “Using Upper-Elementary Student Performance to Understand Conceptual Sequencing in a Blocks-based Curriculum.” They’re studying over 100 students, and starting to develop general findings about what works at each of these grade levels. Three of their findings are quoted here:

Finding 1: Placing simple instructions in sequence and using simple events in a block-based language is accessible to 4th-6th grade students.

Finding 2: Initialization is challenging for 4th and 5th grade students.

Finding 3: 6th grade students are more precise at 2-dimension navigation than 4th and 5th grade students.

I’ve always suspected that there was likely to be an interaction between a student’s level of cognitive development and what they would likely be able to do in programming, given how much students are learning about abstraction and representation at these ages. Certainly, programming might influence cognitive development. It’s important to figure out what we might expect.

That’s what Diana’s group is doing. She isn’t saying that fourth grader’s can’t initialize variables and properties. She’s saying it’s challenging for them. Her results are likely influenced by Scratch and by how the students were taught — it’s still an important result. Diana’s group is offering a starting point for exploring these interactions and understanding what we can expect to be easy and what might be hard for the average elementary school student at different ages.  There may be studies that also tell us about developmental progressions in countries that are ahead of the US in elementary school CS (e.g., maybe Israel or Germany). This is the first study of its kind that I’ve read.

SIGCSE 2017 introduced having Best Paper awards in multiple categories and Exemplary Paper awards. I applaud these initiatives. Other conferences have these kinds of awards. The awards helps our authors stand out in job searches and promotion time.

To be really meaningful awards, though, SIGCSE has to fix the reviewing processes. There were hiccups in this year’s reviewing where there wasn’t much of a match between reviewer expertise and the paper’s topic. The hiccups led to papers with significant flaws getting high rankings.

The Best Paper award in the Experience Report category was “Making Noise: Using Sound-Art to Explore Technological Fluency.” The authors describe a really nifty idea. They implement a “maker” kind of curriculum. One of the options is that students get toys that make noise then modify and reprogram them. The toys already work, so it’s about understanding a system, then modifying and augmenting it. The class sounds great, but as Leah Buchele has pointed out, “maker” curricula can be overwhelmingly male. I was surprised that this award-winning paper doesn’t mention females or gender — at all. (There is one picture of a female student in the paper.) I understand that it’s an Experience Report, but gender diversity is a critical issue in CS education, particularly with maker curricula. I consider the omission of even a mention of gender to be a significant flaw in the paper.

April 3, 2017 at 7:00 am 9 comments


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