Governor of Rhode Island explains why we should teach programming to everyone

February 16, 2018 at 7:00 am 1 comment

Gina Raimondo, the governor of Rhode Island, was on Freakonomics Radio a few weeks ago. Stephen Dubner challenged their plans to offer computing education at all grade levels in every district.  She had a strong response. Dubner’s question is good. We still don’t have the empirical evidence for the value of teaching computing to everyone. We should do that research — not to figure out if Raimondo made the right bet, but to tune what we’re doing to make sure that we get the maximum benefit for the investment.

I recommend the whole interview.

DUBNER: So, I hear about this kind of thinking a lot, and I certainly understand the appeal and the resonance. But I do also wonder if there’s a proven upside of having everyone learn computer science or programming. It strikes me a little bit like the equivalent of having every student in America during the boom of the internal combustion engine learn to take apart a carburetor. And then I think, if you look at the history of economics and progress, that one of the main strengths of economic progress is the division of labor and specialization, rather than everybody chasing after the latest trends. So I’m curious what the evidence was that inspired that move of yours.

RAIMONDO: I think of it as access and exposure, and also just providing people with a basic level of essential skills. So, everyone has to take math. They may become a writer, they may become an actor, but they ought to have a certain basic level of math skills. First of all, because it’s an essential skill to function. And by the way, they might like math. I think digital skills are the same thing. No matter what job you have, you have to have some basic familiarity with computer skills and digital skills. And so it is as essential in this economy as any other skill that we teach. But also, we know — and there’s loads of data on this girls, people of color, and low-income folks are less likely to go into I.T. fields, which tend to be higher-paying. However, if they’re exposed to some computer training, they’re much more likely to go into the field and do well at it.

Source: How to Be a Modern Democrat — and Win – Freakonomics

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Teasing out the meaning of “online classes” — Online Courses Are Harming the Students Who Need the Most Help: NYTimes Stanford is NOT switching from Java to JavaScript: I was mistaken

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Jenny  |  February 16, 2018 at 8:06 am

    Yes, computational thinking is become increasingly important in our daily life. In China, some province like Zhejiang province have already added computer science as one of subjects of University entrance examination.


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