Archive for November 9, 2018

When do we know that a programming course is not working for non-CS majors?

There’s a good discussion going on in Facebook that I wanted to make more public and raise as a question here.  The crush of undergraduates in CS today is making it difficult to offer tailored introductory CS courses to different majors.  The problem is particularly acute when designing instruction for future CS teachers.  If you put the CS teachers in the same course as the CS majors, it’s cheaper and easier — you just teach one big course, rather than multiple smaller courses. But is it as effective?

Some of my colleagues suggest that we can design undergraduate introductory computing courses that are effective for both non-CS and CS majors.  Here’s my question: How do you know when it’s not working?  At what point would you admit that the one course option isn’t working? It’s an interesting empirical question.

Here are some possible measures:

  • Learning is a tricky measure.  For any discipline, the majors in that discipline are more motivated to learn more than the outside-the-discipline majors. You can’t expect the non-CS majors to learn more than the CS majors.  Then again, the non-CS majors probably come in knowing less.  If you do pre- and post-tests on CS knowledge, do non-CS majors have as large of a gain as the CS majors?  I don’t know, but in any case, it’s not a great measure for deciding if a class is succeeding for the non-CS majors.
  • Taking more CS courses may be an effective measure, but only if you have more than one course that’s useful to non-CS majors.  If the rest of the classes are about software development, then non-CS majors will probably not want to go on, even if the intro course was effective and well-designed.
  • Retention is a reasonable measure.  If more of the non-CS majors are dropping out from the course than the CS majors, you may not be meeting their needs.
  • My favorite measure is relevance I argued in my blog post on Monday that programming is a practice that is relevant to many communities. Do the non-CS majors see the relevance of computing for them and their community after the introductory course?  If not, I don’t think it’s meeting their needs.
  • Another tricky measure is use. Should non-CS majors be able (after their first course) to build some program that they find useful?  Certainly, if you achieve that goal, you have also achieved relevance.  How do you judge useful?  CS faculty may not be good judges of what a non-CS major would find useful, and CS faculty are most likely going to assess in terms of code quality (e.g., modularization, appropriate variable and function/module names, commenting, code style, etc.), which I consider pretty unimportant for as a measure for the non-CS students’ experience in the first course.

What do you think?  How would you know if your intro course was meeting non-CS students’ needs?

November 9, 2018 at 7:00 am 12 comments


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