Archive for November 23, 2018

Literature is to Composition, as Computer Science is to Computational Literacy/Thinking

Coding_Literacy___The_MIT_Press

Annette Vee was visiting in Ann Arbor, and looked me up. We had coffee and a great conversation.  Annette is an English Professor who teaches Composition at University of Pittsburgh (see website here). She published a book last year with MIT Press, Coding Literacy: How Computer Programming is Changing Writing. (I’m part way through it and recommend it!) She knew me from this blog and my other writing about computational literacy. I was thrilled to meet someone who makes the argument for code-as-literacy with a real claim to understanding literacy.

One of the themes in our conversation was the distinction between literature and composition.  (I’m going to summarize something we were talking about — Annette is not responsible for me getting things wrong here.) Literature is about doing writing very well, about writing great works that stand the test of time. It’s about understanding and emulating greater writers.  Composition is about writing well for communicationIt’s about letters to Grandma, and office memos, and making your emails effective.  Composition is about writing understandable prose, not great prose as in literature. People in literature sometimes look down on those in composition.

There’s a similar distinction to be made between computer science as it’s taught in Universities and what Annette and I are calling coding/computational literacy (but which might be what Aman Yadav and Shuchi Grover are calling computational thinking).  Computer science aims to prepare people to engineer complex, robust, and secure systems that work effectively for many users. Computational literacy is about people using code to communicate, to express thoughts, and to test ideas. This code doesn’t have to be pretty or robust. It certainly shouldn’t be complex, or nobody will do it. It should be secure, but that security should probably be built into the programming system rather than expecting to teach people about it (as Ben Herold recently talked about).  People in computer science will likely look down on those teaching computational literacy or computational thinking. That’s okay.

Few people will write literature. Everyone will compose.

November 23, 2018 at 7:00 am 41 comments


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