Archive for May 27, 2019

Why I say task-specific programming languages instead of domain-specific programming languages

I’ve written several posts about task-specific programming languages over the last few weeks (here’s the first one), culminating in my new understanding of computational thinking (see that blog post).

The programming languages community talks about “domain-specific programming languages.”  That makes a lot of sense, as a contrast with “general purpose programming languages.” Why am I using a different term?

It’s inspired from my interaction with social studies teachers. They talk about “the language used in math class” and about “what language should we use in history?” History and mathematics are domains. If we talk about a programming language for all of history, that’s too big. It will be difficult to design languages to be easily learned and used.  There are lots of tasks in history that are amenable to using computing to improve learning, including data visualization and testing the rigor of arguments.

“Task-specific programming language” makes clear that we’re talking about a task, not a whole domain. I don’t want teachers rejecting a language because “I can’t use it for everything.”  I want teachers to accept a language because it helps their students learn something. I want it to be so easy to learn and use, that (a) it’s not adding much additional load and (b) it’s obvious that it would help.

I like “task-specific programming language,” too, because the name suggests how we might design them. Human-computer interface researchers and designers have been developing methods to analyze tasks and design interfaces for those tasks for decades. The purpose of that analysis is to create interfaces for users to achieve those tasks easily and with minimal up-front learning.  For 25 years (Soloway, Guzdial, and Hay, 1994) , we have been trying to extend those techniques to design for learners, so that users achieve the tasks and learn in the process.

Task-specific programming languages are domain-specific programming languages (from the PL community) that are designed using learner-centered design methods (HCI).  It’s about integrating between two communities to create something that enables integration of computing across the curriculum.

 

May 27, 2019 at 7:00 am 5 comments


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