Data science as a path to integrate computing into K-12 schools and achieve CS for All

April 27, 2020 at 7:00 am Leave a comment

My colleague Betsy DiSalvo is part of the team that just released Beats Empire, an educational game for assessing what students understand about middle school computer science and data science https://info.beatsempire.org The game was designed by researchers from Teachers College, Columbia University; Georgia Tech; University of Wisconsin, Madison; SRI International; Digital Promise; and Filament Games in concert with the NYC Dept. of Education. Beats Empire is totally free; it has already won game design awards, and it is currently in use by thousands of students. Jeremy Roschelle was a consultant on the game and he just wrote a CACM Blog post about the reasoning behind the game (see link here).

Beats Empire is an example of an important development in the effort to help more students get the opportunity to participate in computing education. Few students are taking CS classes, even when they’re offered — less than 5% in every state for whom I’ve seen data (see blog post here). If we want students to see and use computing, we’ll need to put them in other classes. Data science fits in well with other classes, especially social studies classes. Bootstrap: Data Science (see link here) is another example of a computing-rich data science curriculum that could fit into a social studies class.

Social studies is where we can reach the more diverse student populations who are not in our CS classes. I’ve written here about my work developing data visualization tools for history classes. For a recent NSF proposal, I looked up the exam participation in the two Advanced Placement exams in computer science (CS Principles and CS A) vs the two AP exams in history (US history and World history). AP CS Principles was 32% female, and AP CS A was 24% female in 2019. In contrast, AP US History was 55% female and AP World History was 56% female. Five times as many Black students took the AP US History exam as took the AP CS Principles exam. Fourteen times as many Hispanic students took the AP US History exam as took the AP CS Principles exam.

Data science may be key to providing CS for All in schools.

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Active learning has differential benefits for underserved students SIGCSE 2020: Papers freely available, AP CSA over AP CSP for diversifying computing, and a tour of computing ed research in one hour

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