Archive for October, 2020

Define Computer Science so CS Departments include CS Ed

The CSEd Grad website and research project is supporting growth of research in CS education by supporting pathways for CSEd graduate students. I am excited to be speaking at their conference in a couple weeks (see program here), in a Q&A session with Dr. Amy Ko.

Where would you expect that pathway to lead? Where would you expect faculty working in CS Education research to have their academic home? Education? Information? Computer Science?

If we want to see computer science departments include CS education research, then we have to define computer science in a way that includes computing education research. My favorite definition of computer science is the first one published, in 1967 from Allen Newell, Alan Perlis, and Herbert Simon (all three Turing Award laureates, and Simon is also a Nobel laureate). They say that: Computer science is the study of the phenomena surrounding computers. Helping people to learn what computation is and how to program falls within that definition — it’s part of the phenomena surrounding computers. Some historians, like Nathan Ensmenger (see post here), have suggested that the lack of investment and innovation in CS education influenced the direction of CS research.

Most definitions of computer science are not as broad as that. CSTA, Code.org, and ECEP have just come out with a new report on the state of CS Education in the United States (see report here). The definition they use (see K-12 Framework page here): “the study of computers and algorithmic processes, including their principles, their hardware and software designs, their implementation, and their impact on society” This definition includes fields like social computing and human-computer interaction, but doesn’t include the study of how people learn about computing. That’s a little ironic, that a report promoting CS education is promoting a definition that keeps education out of CS.

The definition matters when decisions are made on the basis of it. A popular website that ranks CS departments around the world, CSRankings.org, does not include CS education. I wrote my Blog@CACM post this month on my critique of CSRankings.org (see post here). I am opposed to it because it’s America-first, anti-progressive, and anti-interdisciplinarity. People make decisions based on CSRankings.org. Graduate students use it to pick departments to apply to. Recommendation letters reference CSRankings.org for what is quality CS. If people use CSRankings.org to determine what “counts” (for attracting students, for promotion and tenure), then CS education literally doesn’t count. Researchers in CS education are at a disadvantage if their work doesn’t help their department in influential rankings.

Let’s define computer science to reflect our values long-term. Where do we build a home for CS education researchers in the future?

October 26, 2020 at 9:00 pm 8 comments

Social Studies Teachers using Programming for Data Visualization: An FIE 2020 Paper Preview

The Frontiers in Education (FIE) 2020 conference starts Wednesday October 21 in Uppsala, Sweden — see program here. My student Bahare Naimipour will be presenting our paper “Engaging Pre-Service Teachers in Front-End Design: Developing Technology for a Social Studies Classroom” (see preprint here) by Bahare, me, and Tammy Shreiner. This work came long before the NSF work that we just got funded for (see blog post here), but it’s in the same line of research.

The paper is about two of our participatory design sessions with pre-service social studies teachers in Tammy’s class on data literacy. In both of these sessions, we asked teachers to program in JavaScript or Vega-Lite to build a visualization, and in the second one, we also introduce CODAP, a visualization tool explicitly designed for middle and high school students. The paper is less about the technology and more about what the teachers told us about what they thought about tools for visualization in their class.

Social studies teachers are such an interesting group to study. They’re not particularly interested in STEM, data, or computers. They want to teach social studies. Very few of our participants had ever seen any code. (One told us, “This looks a lot like setting up my MySpace page in middle school!”)They’re only interested if we can help them teach what they want to teach. It’s a hard audience to engage, in all the right ways.

I’m going to highlight just two lessons we learned here:

First: The results from the two participatory design sessions were remarkably different. Participatory design isn’t a “okay, we did that — check off the box” methodology. Each group of participants can be remarkably different. There’s no generalization here. Each session is useful, but I don’t know how many sessions we’d have to do to get anywhere near saturation. That’s okay — we learned design lessons from each session.

Second: There is no one answer to how teachers think about programming. I have heard from many people that teachers find programming hard (see this CACM Blog post about that discussion), and I’ve hypothesized that to be true in this blog (see this post). So, now I’ve been in the room as social studies teachers have their first programming experiences and interviewing them afterwards, and….it’s complicated.

Teachers tell us often in our sessions that programming is overwhelming, but several teachers also told us that CODAP (explicitly designed for their use, and not a programming tool) was overwhelming. The question is whether it’s worth the complexity — and for whom. We get contradictory responses from the teachers, which we report in this paper. One told us that she wanted a simpler tool for herself and JavaScript for her students: “I don’t mind keeping life simple for me, but I wanted to challenge my students and give them useful, new skills.” Another teacher told us the opposite: “I would like Java[script] because it would let me do more to the visualization. Vega-lite would be better for students because it seems far more simple.”

We couldn’t fit in all the great stories and insights from these two participatory design sessions. Like the teacher who wants JavaScript in her class because, “That’s similar to what they use in math and science, right? I don’t want history to be the ‘dumbed-down’ programming.” I found that surprising, and wondered what the teachers would think of a block-based language. Another teacher told us that she wants to use programming in her history class, “Because maybe that would make history ‘cool.’” One of the tensions I found most interesting in these sessions was between the desire to know the tools and be comfortable in front of the class, and the desire to push their students to learn more. Some teachers told us that they preferred CODAP to any programming tool because they would be embarrassed to get a syntax error in front of their kids, which they realized would always be possible when programming. Other teachers told us that they were more concerned with going beyond basic tools — (paraphrasing one comment we received), “My students will already know Excel and Google Sheets. I want them to do more in my class.”

Our work is ramping up now. We had another PD session with pre-service teachers in March, just before pandemic lockdown, which was our first one with our data visualization tool in the mix. We’ve just held our first workshop in August for in-service (practicing) teachers. We’ve got more workshops planned over the next year. You’ll likely be hearing more from these studies in future posts.

October 19, 2020 at 7:00 am 3 comments

HyperBlocks come to Snap! — UX for PX in CS4All

Jens Moenig kindly shared with me a video announcing HyperBlocks that he’s added to the next version of Snap! The idea of hyperblocks is to support vector and matrix operations in Snap!, as in APL or MATLAB.

I’m interested in the research question whether vector operations are easier or harder for students, including considering who the students are (e.g., does more math background make vector operations easier?) and how we define easier or harder (e.g., is it about startup costs, or the ability to build larger and more sophisticated programs?). My suspicion based on the work of folks like L.A. Miller, John Pane, Diana Franklin, Debbie Fields, and Yasmin Kafai is that vector operations would be easier. Students find iteration hard. Users have found it easier to describe operations on sets than to define a process which applies the operation to specific elements. It’s a fascinating area for future research.

And, you can do Media Computation more easily (as Jens shows) which is a real win in my book!

They also have an online course, on using Snap! from Media Computation to Data Science: https://open.sap.com/courses/snap2

Soon after Jens sent me this video, I got to see him do this in real-time at Snap!Con, and then he and Brian Harvey won the NTLS Education Leadership Award for their work on Snap! (see link here). Congratulations to them both!

So here’s the question that I wonder: Who does Snap! work for, and who doesn’t it?

  • I find Snap! fascinating but not usable for me. I have tried to do what I see Jens doing, but have to keep going back and forth from the video to the tool. It’s not obvious, for example, where to get the camera input and how to use it. I’m sure if I spent enough time using Snap!, I’d get it. What teachers and students are willing to pay that cost? Obviously, some are — Snap! is popular and used in many places. Who gets turned off to Snap!? Who doesn’t succeed at it?
  • I attended some of the sessions at Snap!Con this summer: https://www.snapcon.org/conferences/2020. I was particularly struck by Paul Goldenberg’s session. He showed videos of a young kid (somewhere in 8-10) using Snap!. He was struggling to place blocks with a trackpad. Think about it — press down at the right place, drag across the trackpad without lifting up, release at the right place. This is hard for young kids.

These are important questions to consider in pursuit of tools that enable CS for All. UX for PX – how do we design the user experience of the programming experience.

P.S. Jens just sent me the link to his Snap!Con talk video: https://youtu.be/K1qR4vTAw4w

October 5, 2020 at 7:00 am 10 comments


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