Broadening Participation in Computing is Different in Every State: Michigan as an Example

January 21, 2021 at 7:00 am Leave a comment

In December, Rick Adrion, Sarah T. Dunton, Barbara Ericson, Renee Fall, Carol Fletcher, and I published an essay in Communications of the ACM, “U.S. States Must Broaden Participation While Expanding Access to Computer Science Education.” (See link here, and pre-print available at the bottom of this post.). Rick, Renee, Barb, and I were the founders of the ECEP Alliance which helps states and US territories with their computing education policy and practices. Carol is now the PI on ECEP (which feels so great to say — ECEP continues past the founders, with excellent leadership) — the whole leadership team is here. Sarah likely knows more about state-level computing education policy than anyone else in the US. She has worked with individual teams in individual states for years. Our argument is that broadening participation and expanding access are not the same thing. Simply making CS classes available doesn’t get students into those classes. We tell the story of two states (Nevada and Rhode Island) and how CS Ed is growing there.

Barbara and I now live in Michigan. The CSTA, Code.org, and ECEP report 2020 State of Computer Science Education: Illuminating Disparities (see link here) has a sub-report for every US state. Michigan is on page 56. The press release for the 2020 report says that 47% of US high schools now offer CS. Michigan is at 37%. Michigan is the only state (as far as I can tell) that used to have CS teacher certification and pre-service CS but got rid of it (story here).

Also in December, Michigan Department of Education (MDE) released the first “State of Computer Science in Michigan Report” (see link here). The data collection and writing on the report was led by Aman Yadav and Sarah Gretter of Michigan State with Cheryl Wilson of MDE. A quote from page 11: “The trend of declining course offerings continues at the high school level where even fewer high schools offer CS courses. Code.org course offering data suggests that only 23.7% of rural high schools, 28% of town high schools, 29.1% of sub-urban high schools, and 21.7% of city high schools offer CS.” (The numbers on the website are lower than these — Aman and Cheryl kindly sent me an early peek at a revision that they’re posting soon.)

MDE’s numbers are a lot lower than the 37% in the Code.org/CSTA/ECEP report. What’s going on here? My best guess is that CS is rare enough in Michigan that not everybody who fills out a survey knows what the national CS education movement means by “computer science.” We had this a lot in the early days of “Georgia Computes,” too. A principal would say that they teach CS, when they might mean Microsoft Office or Web design (with no HTML, CSS, or JavaScript).

In any case, Michigan is clearly below national averages on providing CS education to its citizens and creating sustainable CS education policy. How do we help Michigan progress in providing computing education to its citizens?

I don’t know. Aman, Barb, and I have had conversations about the potential for growing CS Ed in Michigan. We don’t have the same leverage points in Michigan that we have had in other ECEP states. Michigan is a local control state. Individual local education agencies (LEA’s — sometimes a school district, sometimes a county-wide collection of districts) can make up their own rules on important issues like CS teacher certification. In Georgia and South Carolina, the state government has a lot of control in education, so there was a point of leverage. California is also a local control state, but the California University systems are important to all high schools, so that’s a point of influence. Massachusetts is again a local control state, but the Tech industry is very important to the Boston area, and that’s important to the state. Tech isn’t important in the same way in Michigan. If you read the MDE report, there’s a lot of ambivalence about CS in the state. Administrators aren’t that excited about teaching CS. They don’t see CS education as important for their students. Michigan is a big state, where agriculture and tourism are two of the most significant industries. Manufacturing is a big deal, but manufacturing workers don’t necessarily need to know much about computing. CS isn’t an obvious benefit to much of Michigan.

Aman’s strategy is to grow CS education in the state slowly, to develop pockets of value for CS and success in teaching CS. We have to plant seeds and grow to a critical mass, which seems like the right approach to me. He has projects where he is helping develop teachers and relevant curriculum for CS education in specific counties. He works closely with the MDE. Sarah is involved with Apple’s Developer Academy to open in Detroit (see story here). Michigan does have a powerful and large teacher’s group supporting educational technology, MACUL (Michigan Association for Computer Users in Learning, see website), which could be a significant player in growing CS education in the state.

The important point here is that, in the United States, growing CS education is a state-by-state challenge. Each state has its own story and issues.

Pre-print of CACM BPC article

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Promote diversity by teaching to many goals for computing ICER 2021 Call for Papers out with Changes for ICER Authors

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