Archive for April 19, 2021

From Guided Exploration to Possible Adoption: Patterns of Pre-Service Social Studies Teacher Engagement with Programming and Non-Programming Based Learning Technology Tools

In October, Bahare Naimipour presented our paper ”From Guided Exploration to Possible Adoption: Patterns of Pre-Service Social Studies Teacher Engagement with Programming and Non-Programming Based Learning Technology Tools” (Naimipour, Guzdial, Shreiner, and Spencer, 2021) at the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE) 2021 conference. (Draft of the paper is available here. Full paywall version available here.) This paper is the first one about our work with social studies teachers since we received NSF funding. It was also a report on our last face-to-face participatory design session (in March 2020) before the pandemic lockdown. And most importantly, it was our first session with our data visualization tool DV4L in the mix.

I have blogged about our participatory design sessions before (see Bahare’s FIE paper from last Fall). Basically, we set up a group of social studies teachers in pairs, then ask them to try out various visualization tools with activity sheets that we have created to scaffold their process. The goal is to get everyone to make a visualization successfully in less than 10 minutes, and leave time to explore or try one (or both) other tools. There is time for the pairs to persuade each other to (a) come try the cool tool they found or (b) avoid this tool because it’s too hard or not useful. The tools in this set were Vega-Lite (a declarative programming tool which our teachers have found complex but useful in the past), CODAP (a drag-and-drop visualization tool designed for middle and high school students), and our DV4L (a purpose-built visualization tool that makes code visible but not required).

The teachers saw value in having students build visualization themselves (e.g., “I think making your own data visualization allows for a deeper connection and understanding of the data.”) As we hoped, they teased out what they liked and disliked about the tools. Most of the teachers preferred DV4L over the other two tools, because of its simplicity. Critically, they felt that they were engaging with the inquiry and not the tool: “(With DV4L) I found myself asking questions connected to the data itself, rather than asking questions in order to figure out how to work the visual.”

That teachers found DV4L easier than Vega-Lite isn’t really surprising. We were pleased that teachers weren’t disappointed with DV4L’s more limited visualization capabilities. What was really surprising was that our teachers preferred DV4L to CODAP, and this has happened in successive in-service teacher participatory design sessions during the pandemic. CODAP is drag-and-drop, creates high-quality visualizations, and was designed explicitly for middle and high school students. A teacher in one of our in-service design sessions explained to me why she preferred DV4L to CODAP. “CODAP is really powerful, but it would take me at least three hours to get my students comfortable with it. Is it worth it?” Just how much visualization is any social studies teacher going to use? Again, too much focus on the tool gets in the way of the social studies inquiry.

Now you might be asking, “But Mark, do the students learn history with DV4L? And do they see and learn about computing?” Great questions — we’re not there yet. Here’s one of our big questions, after running several more participatory design sessions with teachers since the lockdown: Why aren’t teachers adopting DV4L in their classrooms? They tell us that they really like it. But nobody’s adopted yet. How do we go from “ooh, great tool!” to “and here’s my lesson plan, and we’ll use it next week”? That’s an active area of research for all of us right now.

April 19, 2021 at 7:00 am 2 comments


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