Archive for August 16, 2021

ICER 2021 Preview: The Challenges of Validated Assessments, Developing Rich Conceptualizations, and Understanding Interest #icer2021

The International Computing Education Research Conference (ICER) 2021 is this week (website here). It should have been in Charleston, South Carolina (one of my favorite cities), but it will instead be all on-line. Unlike previous years, if you are not already registered, you’re unfortunately out of luck. As seen in Matthias Hauswirth’s terrific guest blog post from last week (see here), getting set up in Clowdr is complicated. ICER won’t have the resources to bring people on-line and get them through the half hour prep sessions on-the-fly. There will be no “onsite” registration.

However, all the papers should be available in the ACM Digital Library (free for some time), and I think all the videos of the talks will be made available after the fact, so you can still gain a lot from the conference. Let me point out a few of the highlights that I’m excited about. (As of this writing, the papers are not yet appearing in the ACM DL — all the DOI links are failing for me. I’ll include the links here in hopes that everything is fixed soon.)

Our keynoter is Tammy Clegg, whom I got to know when she was a PhD student at Georgia Tech. She’s now at U. Maryland doing amazing work around computation and relevant science learning. I’m so looking forward to hearing what she has to say to the ICER community.

Miranda Parker, Allison Elliott Tew, and I have a paper “Uses, Revisions, and the Future of Validated Assessments in Computing Education: A Case Study of the FCS1 and SCS1.” This is a paper that we planned to write when Miranda first developed the SCS1 (first published in 2016). We created the SCS1 in order to send it out to the world for use in research. We hoped that we could sometime later do in CS what Richard Hake did in Physics, when he used the FCI to make some strong statements about teaching practices with a pool of 6,000 students (see paper here). Hake’s paper had a huge impact, as it started making the case to shift from lecture to active learning. Could we use the collected use of the SCS1 to make some strong arguments for improving CS learning? We decided that we couldn’t. The FCI was used in pretty comparable situations, and it’s tightly focused on force. CS1 is far too broad, and FCS1 and SCS1 are being used in so many different places — not all of which it’s been validated for. Our retrospective paper is kind of a systemic literature review, but it’s done from the perspective of tracing these two instruments and how they’ve been used by the research community.

One of the papers that I got a sneak peek at was “When Wrong is Right: The Instructional Power of Multiple Conceptions” by Lauren Margulieux, Paul Denny, Katie Cunningham, Mike Deutsch, and Ben Shapiro. The paper is exploring the tensions between direct instruction and more student-directed approaches (like constructionism and inquiry learning) (see a piece I did in 2015 about these tensions). The basic argument of this new paper is that just telling students the right answer is not enough to develop rich understanding. We have to figure out how to help students to be able to hold and compare multiple conceptions (not all of which is canonical or held by experts), so that they can compare and contrast, and use the right one at the right time.

I’m chair for a session on interest. While I haven’t seen the papers yet, I got to watch the presentations (which are already loaded in Clowdr). “Children’s Implicit and Explicit Stereotypes on the Gender, Social Skills, and Interests of a Computer Scientist” by de Wit, Hermans, and Aivaloglou is a report on a really interesting experiment. They look at how kids associate gender with activities (e.g., are boys more connected to video games than girls?). The innovative part is that they asked the questions and timed the answers. A quick answer likely connects to implicit beliefs. If they take a long time to answer, maybe they told you what they thought you wanted to hear? The second paper “All the Pieces Matter: The Relationship of Momentary Self-efficacy and Affective Experiences with CS1 Achievement and Interest in Computing” by Lishinski and Rosenberg asks about what leads to students succeeding and wanting to continue in computing. They look at students affective state coming into CS1 (e..g, how much do they like computing? How much do they think that they can succeed in computing?), and relate that to students’ experiences and affective state after the class. They make some interesting claims about gender — that gender gaps are really self-efficacy gaps.

One of the more unusual sessions is a pair of papers from IT University of Copenhagen that make up a whole session. ICER doesn’t often give over a whole session to a single research group on multiple papers. One is “Computing Educational Activities Involving People Rather Than Things Appeal More to Women (Recruitment Perspective)” and the other is “Computing Educational Activities Involving People Rather Than Things Appeal More to Women (CS1 Appeal Perspective).” The pitch is that framing CS1 as being about people rather than things leads to better recruitment (first paper) and more success in CS1 (second paper) in terms of gender diversity. It’s empirical support for a hypothesis that we’ve heard before, and the authors frame the direction succinctly: “CS is about people not things.” Is that succinct enough to get CS faculty to adopt this and teach CS differently?

August 16, 2021 at 7:00 am Leave a comment


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