Posts tagged ‘ICER’

A Place to Get Feedback and Develop New Ideas: WIPW at ICER 2018

Everybody’s got an idea that they’re sure is great, or could be great with just a bit of development. Similarly, everyone has hit a tricky crossroads in their research and could use a little nudge to get unstuck. The ICER Work in Progress workshop is the place to get feedback and help on that idea, and give feedback and help to others on their cool ideas. I did it a few years ago at the Glasgow ICER and had a wonderful day. You learn a lot, and you get a bunch of new insights about your own idea. As Workshop Leader (and the inventor of the ICER Work in Progress workshop series) Colleen Lewis put it, “You get the chance to borrow the brains of some really awesome people to work on your problem.”

Colleen is the Senior Chair again this year, and I’m the Junior Chair-in-Training.

The workshop is only one day and super-fun. If you’re attending ICER this year, please apply for the Work in Progress workshop! https://icer.hosting.acm.org/icer-2018/work-in-progress/ The application is due June 8 (it’s just a quick Google form).

Let Colleen or me know if you have questions!

May 30, 2018 at 7:00 am 2 comments

ICER 2018 Call for Participation (I’m co-chairing Works in Progress)

Do submit to ICER 2018 in Finland.  I particularly encourage you to join the Works in Progress workshop, for which I’ll be the junior co-chair as I learn the ropes from Colleen Lewis. I was a participant in the Works in Progress workshop in Glasgow and found it fun and useful.

ICER’18 – Call For Participation

The fourteenth annual ACM International Computing Education Research (ICER) Conference aims to gather high-quality contributions to the computing education research discipline. We invite submissions across a variety of categories for research investigating how people of all ages come to understand computational processes and devices, and empirical evaluation of approaches to improve that understanding in formal and informal learning environments.


Research areas of particular interest include:
– discipline based education research (DBER) in computer science (CS), information sciences (IS), and related disciplines
– design-based research, learner-centered design, and evaluation of educational technology supporting computing knowledge or skills development
pedagogical environments fostering computational thinking
learning sciences work in the computing content domain
psychology of programming
learning analytics and educational data mining in CS/IS content areas
learnability/usability of programming languages
informal learning experiences related to programming and software development (all ages), ranging from after-school programs for children, to end-user development communities, to workplace training of computing professionals
measurement instrument development and validation (e.g., concept inventories, attitudes scales, etc) for use in computing disciplines
research on CS/computing teacher thinking and professional development models at all levels
rigorous replication of empirical work to compare with or extend previous empirical research results
systematic literature review on some topic related to computer science education


In addition to standard research paper contributions, we continue our longstanding commitment to fostering discussion and exploring new research areas by offering several ways to engage. These include a doctoral consortium for graduate students just prior to the conference, a work-in-progress workshop for researchers following the conference, and poster and lightning talks. This is in addition to the format of conference sessions, where all research paper presentations include time for discussion among the attendees followed by feedback to the paper presenters.

Submission Categories

ICER provides multiple options for participation, with various levels of discussion and interaction between the presenter and audience. These sessions also support work at various levels, ranging from formative work to polished, complete research results.


Research Papers
Papers are limited to 8 pages, excluding references, double-blind peer reviewed and published in the ACM digital library as part of the conference proceedings. Accepted papers are allotted time for presentation and discussion at the conference


Doctoral Consortium
2 page extended abstract submission required and published in ACM digital library as part of the conference proceedings. Students will present their work to distinguished faculty mentors during an all-day workshop and during the conference in a dedicated poster session.


Lightning Talks and Posters
Abstract (250 words) submission required and made available on conference website, but not published in proceedings. Accepted abstracts for lightning talks will be given a 3-minute time slot for rapid presentation at the conference followed by a discussion period for all attendees. Posters may either accompany a lightning talk or may be proposed separately using the same abstract submission process.


Work in Progress Workshop
This one-day workshop is a venue to get sustained engagement with and feedback about early work in computing education.    White paper submission required but not included in proceedings.


Co-located Workshops
Proposals for pre/post conference workshops of interest to the ICER community (i.e., those that aim to advance computer science education research) are welcomed and encouraged. ICER local arrangements personnel will be available to assist with workshop logistics where possible. If interested, contact the conference chairs for more details by April 10th, 2018: Lauri.Malmi@aalto.fi or Ari.Korhonen@aalto.fi.


For more information about preparation and submission, please visit the page corresponding to the submission type of interest.

Important Deadlines and Dates


Research Papers

30 March, 2018 – – Abstract submission (250 words, mandator)
6 April, 2018 – – Full paper submission 
1 June – – Notification of acceptance 
15 June – -Final camera ready deadline
Other Submission Types
1 May – – Doctoral consortium submissions
8 June – – Lightning talk and Poster proposals
8 June – – Work in progress workshop application

Conference Schedule

Doctoral Consortium, Sunday, August 12, 2018
ICER Conference, Monday, August 13 – Wednesday August 15, 2018
Work in Progress Workshop, Wednesday evening, August 15 – Thursday, August 16, 2018
For more details, see the conference website:
 http://www.icer-conference.org

Conference Co-Chairs
Lauri Malmi, Aalto University, Finland (Lauri.Malmi@aalto.fi)
Ari Korhonen, Aalto University, Finland (Ari.Korhonen@aalto.fi
Robert McCartney, University of Connecticut, USA (robert.mccartney@uconn.edu)
Andrew Petersen, University of Toronto Mississauga, Canada (andrew.petersen@utoronto.ca)


AUTHORS TAKE NOTE: The official publication date is the date the proceedings are made available in the ACM Digital Library. This date will be up to two weeks prior to the first day of the conference. The official publication date affects the deadline for any patent filings related to published work.

January 15, 2018 at 7:30 am Leave a comment

Teachers are not the same as students, and the role of tracing: ICER 2017 Preview

The International Computing Education Research conference starts today at the University of Washington in Tacoma. You can find the conference schedule here, and all the proceedings in the ACM Digital Library here. In past years, all the papers have been free for the first couple weeks after the conference, so grab them while they are outside the paywall.

Yesterday was the Doctoral Consortium, which had a significant Georgia Tech presence. My colleague Betsy DiSalvo was one of the discussants. Two of my PhD students were participants:

We have two research papers being presented at ICER this year. Miranda Parker and Kantwon Rogers will be presenting Students and Teachers Use An Online AP CS Principles EBook Differently: Teacher Behavior Consistent with Expert Learners (see paper here) which is from Miranda C. Parker, Kantwon Rogers, Barbara J. Ericson, and me. Miranda and Kantwon studied the ebooks that we've been creating for AP CSP teachers and students (see links here). They're asking a big question: "Can we develop one set of material for both high school teachers and students, or do they need different kinds of materials?" First, they showed that there was statistically significantly different behaviors between teachers and students (e.g. different number of interactions with different types of activities). Then, they tried to explain why there were differences.

We develop a model of teachers as expert learners (e.g., they know more knowledge so they can create more linkages, they know how to learn, they know better how to monitor their learning) and high school students as more novice learners. They dig into the log file data to find evidence consistent with that explanation. For example, students repeatedly try to solve Parsons problems long after they are likely to get it right and learn from it, while teachers move along when they get stuck. Students are more likely to run code and then run it again (with no edits in between) than teachers. At the end of the paper, they offer design suggestions based on this model for how we might develop learning materials designed explicitly for teachers vs. students.

Katie Cunningham will be presenting Using Tracing and Sketching to Solve Programming Problems: Replicating and Extending an Analysis of What Students Draw (see paper here) which is from Kathryn Cunningham, Sarah Blanchard, Barbara Ericson, and me. The big question here is: "Of what use is paper-and-pen based sketching/tracing for CS students?" Several years ago, the Leeds' Working Group (at ITiCSE 2004) did a multi-national study of how students solved complicated problems with iteration, and they collected the students' scrap paper. (You can find a copy of the paper here.) They found (not surprisingly) that students who traced code were far more likely to get the problems right. Barb was doing an experiment for her study of Parsons Problems, and gave scrap paper to students, which Katie and Sarah analyzed.

First, they replicate the Leeds' Working Group study. Those who trace do better on problems where they have to predict the behavior of the code. Already, it's a good result. But then, Katie and Sarah go further. For example, they find it's not always true. If a problem is pretty easy, those who trace are actually more likely to get it wrong, so the correlation goes the other way. And those who start to trace but then give up are even more likely to get it wrong than those who never traced at all.

They also start to ask a tantalizing question: Where did these tracing methods come from? A method is only useful if it gets used — what leads to use? Katie interviewed the two teachers of the class (each taught about half of the 100+ students in the study). Both teachers did tracing in class. Teacher A's method gets used by some students. Teacher B's method gets used by no students! Instead, some students use the method taught by the head Teaching Assistant. Why do some students pick up a tracing method, and why do they adopt the one that they do? Because it's easier to remember? Because it's more likely to lead to a right answer? Because they trust the person who taught it? More to explore on that one.

August 18, 2017 at 7:00 am 1 comment

Call for Nominations to Chair ICER 2019

SIGCSE is changing how they organize ICER.  Posted with Judy Sheard’s permission:

The ACM/SIGCSE International Computing Education Research conference (icer.acm.org) is the premier conference in the world focused on computer science education research, now in its 13th year. The leadership structure has recently been reorganized so that the the individual overseeing the selection of the program (the Program Chair) and the individual overseeing the running of the conference at a particular venue (the Site Chair) are to be held by different individuals.

We are currently seeking nominations for a Site Chair and a Program Chair for ICER 2019, to be held in North America.

Both appointments to Chair are for two years, called the “junior” and “senior” years, respectively. Site Chairs host the conference at their home institution during their senior year. Only one appointment for each role will be made each year, so that in any given year there is a junior and senior Site co-chair and a junior and senior Program co-chair. A nomination committee of the Program and Site chairs for the current year and the SIGCSE Board ICER liaison nominates the ICER Site chair and Program chair to start serving two years from the current year. The SIGCSE Board makes the appointments to both roles.

For both positions, the country of the home institution of each appointee will be rotated geographically by year as has been the tradition for ICER conference chairs, i.e.

  • Year 1: North America
  • Year 2: Europe
  • Year 3: North America
  • Year 4: Australasia

The criteria for appointees:

  • Program co-chair:
    1. Prior attendance at ICER
    2. Prior publication at ICER
    3. Past service on the ICER Program Committee
    4. Research excellence in Computing Education
    5. Collaborative and organizational skills sufficient to work on the Conference Committee and to share oversight of the program selection process.
  • Site chair:
    1. Prior attendance at ICER
    2. Collaborative and organizational skills sufficient to work on the Conference Committee and to oversee all of the local arrangements.
    3. Demonstrated interest in the computing education research community.

To nominate an individual, please include the individual’s CV and a cover letter explaining how the individual meets the criteria for the role. Self-nominations are welcomed. Please send nominations for the Site chair to the 2017 Site Chair, Donald Chinn (dchinn@uw.edu), and nominations for the Program chair to the 2017 Program Chair, Josh Tenenberg (jtenenbg@uw.edu). We also encourage informal expressions of interest to the individuals just mentioned.

March 13, 2017 at 7:00 am Leave a comment

Learning Curves, Given vs Generated Subgoal Labels, Replicating a US study in India, and Frames vs Text: More ICER 2016 Trip Reports

My Blog@CACM post for this month is a trip report on ICER 2016. I recommend Andy Ko’s excellent ICER 2016 trip report for another take on the conference. You can also see the Twitter live feed with hashtag #ICER2016.

I write in the Blog@CACM post about three papers (and reference two others), but I could easily write reports on a dozen more. The findings were that interesting and that well done. I’m going to give four more mini-summaries here, where the results are more confusing or surprising than those I included in the CACM Blog post.

This year was the first time we had a neck-and-neck race for the attendee-selected award, the “John Henry” award. The runner-up was Learning Curve Analysis for Programming: Which Concepts do Students Struggle With? by Kelly Rivers, Erik Harpstead, and Ken Koedinger. Tutoring systems can be used to track errors on knowledge concepts over multiple practice problems. Tutoring systems developers can show these lovely decreasing error curves as students get more practice, which clearly demonstrate learning. Kelly wanted to see if she could do that with open editing of code, not in a tutoring system. She tried to use AST graphs as a sense of programming “concepts,” and measure errors in use of the various constructs. It didn’t work, as Kelly explains in her paper. It was a nice example of an interesting and promising idea that didn’t pan out, but with careful explanation for the next try.

I mentioned in this blog previously that Briana Morrison and Lauren Margulieux had a replication study (see paper here), written with Adrienne Decker using participants from Adrienne’s institution. I hadn’t read the paper when I wrote that first blog post, and I was amazed by their results. Recall that they had this unexpected result where changing contexts for subgoal labeling worked better (i.e., led to better performance) for students than keeping students in the same context. The weird contextual-transfer problems that they’d seen previously went away in the second (follow-on) CS class — see below snap from their slides. The weird result was replicated in the first class at this new institution, so we know it’s not just one strange student population, and now we know that it’s a novice problem. That’s fascinating, but still doesn’t really explain why. Even more interesting was that when the context transfer issues go away, students did better when they were given subgoal labels than when they generated them. That’s not what happens in other fields. Why is CS different? It’s such an interesting trail that they’re exploring!

img_3874

Mike Hewner and Shitanshu Mishra replicated Mike’s dissertation study about how students choose CS as a major, but in Indian institutions rather than in US institutions: When Everyone Knows CS is the Best Major: Decisions about CS in an Indian context. The results that came out of the Grounded Theory analysis were quite different! Mike had found that US students use enjoyment as a proxy for ability — “If I like CS, I must be good at it, so I’ll major in that.” But Indian students already thought CS was the best major. The social pressures were completely different. So, Indian students chose CS — if they had no other plans. CS was the default behavior.

One of the more surprising results was from Thomas W. Price, Neil C.C. Brown, Dragan Lipovac, Tiffany Barnes, and Michael Kölling, Evaluation of a Frame-based Programming Editor. They asked a group of middle school students in a short laboratory study (not the most optimal choice, but an acceptable starting place) to program in Java or in Stride, the new frame-based language and editing environment from the BlueJ/Greenfoot team.  They found no statistically significant differences between the two different languages, in terms of number of objectives completed, student frustration/satisfaction, or amount of time spent on the tasks. Yes, Java students got more syntax errors, but it didn’t seem to have a significant impact on performance or satisfaction. I found that totally unexpected. This is a result that cries out for more exploration and explanation.

There’s a lot more I could say, from Colleen Lewis’s terrific ideas to reduce the impact of CS stereotypes to a promising new method of expert heuristic evaluation of cognitive load.  I recommend reviewing the papers while they’re still free to download.

September 16, 2016 at 7:07 am 4 comments

Andy Ko’s sabbatical research pivot into Computing Education

Great blog post from Andy Ko on why he’s shifting into computing education research.  I hope lots of researchers come to a similar realization — that computing education is valuable, hard, and interesting.

After I stepped down as AnswerDash CTO and begin my post-tenure sabbatical, it became clear I had to pivot my research focus. No more developer tools. No more studies of productivity. I’m now much less interested in accelerating developers’ work, and much more interested shaping how developers (and developers-in-training) learn and shape their behavior.

Source: My sabbatical research pivot | Bits and Behavior

June 1, 2016 at 7:55 am Leave a comment

Call for Participants: ICER Doctoral Consortium, Sept 8th, Melbourne, Australia

The ICER 2016 Doctoral Consortium provides an opportunity for doctoral students studying computing education to explore and develop their research interests in a supportive workshop environment with a panel of established researchers. We invite students to apply for this opportunity to share their work with students in a similar situation as well as senior researchers in the field.

Applicants to the Doctoral Consortium should have begun their research, but should not have completed it.  We want people who have questions to raise with their peers and the more senior mentors, and who still have time to respond to and use the feedback in their research.

DC Co-Chairs for 2016:

Anthony Robins, University of Otago, New Zealand

Ben Shapiro, University of Colorado, USA

Contact us at: icerdc2016@gmail.com

The DC has the following objectives:

  • Provide participants a supportive setting for feedback on their research
  • Offer participants comments and fresh perspectives from outside their own institution
  • Promote the development of a supportive community of scholars
  • Support a new generation of researchers with information and advice on research and academic career paths
  • Contribute to the conference goals through interaction with other researchers and conference events

The DC will be held on Thursday, September 8, 2016 (prior to the main ICER conference, in Melbourne, Australia). Students at any stage of their doctoral studies are welcome to apply and attend. The number of participants is limited to 15. Applicants who are selected will receive a limited partial reimbursement of travel, accommodation and subsistence (i.e., food) expenses of $600 (USD).  An extra $200 may be available for participants with travel expenses greatly exceeding the standard support.

Process Timeline:

  • Friday 20th May – initial submission
  • Friday 3rd June – notification of acceptance
  • Friday 17th June – camera ready copy due

You can find more information on applying athttps://icer.hosting.acm.org/icer-2016/doctoral-consortium/

April 27, 2016 at 7:42 am Leave a comment

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