Posts tagged ‘peer instruction’

Why Students Don’t Like Active Learning: Stop making me work at learning!

I enjoy reading Annie Murphy Paul’s essays, and this one particularly struck home because I just got my student opinion surveys from last semester.  I use active learning methods in my Media Computation class every day, where I require students to work with one another. One student wrote:

“I didn’t like how he forced us to interact with each other. I don’t think that is the best way for me to learn, but it was forced upon me.”

It’s true. I am a Peer Instruction bully.

At a deeper level, it’s amazing how easily we fool ourselves about what we learn from and what we don’t learn from.  It’s like the brain training work.  We’re convinced that we’re learning from it, even if we’re not. This student is convinced that he doesn’t learn from it, even though the available evidence says she or he does.

In case you’re wondering about just what “active learning” is, here’s a widely-accepted definition: “Active learning engages students in the process of learning through activities and/or discussion in class, as opposed to passively listening to an expert. It emphasizes higher-order thinking and often involves group work.”

Source: Why Students Don’t Like Active Learning « Annie Murphy Paul

July 11, 2016 at 7:27 am 7 comments

Why we are teaching science wrong, and how to make it right: It’s about CS retention, too

Important new paper in Nature that makes the argument for active learning in all science classes, which is one of the arguments I was making in my Top Ten Myths blog post. The image and section I’m quoting below are about a different issue than learning — turns out that active learning methods are important for retention, too.

Active learning is winning support from university administrators, who are facing demands for accountability: students and parents want to know why they should pay soaring tuition rates when so many lectures are now freely available online. It has also earned the attention of foundations, funding agencies and scientific societies, which see it as a way to patch the leaky pipeline for science students. In the United States, which keeps the most detailed statistics on this phenomenon, about 60% of students who enrol in a STEM field switch to a non-STEM field or drop out2 (see ‘A persistence problem’). That figure is roughly 80% for those from minority groups and for women.

via Why we are teaching science wrong, and how to make it right : Nature News & Comment.

August 3, 2015 at 7:49 am Leave a comment

A kind of worked examples for large classrooms

I passed on to the MediaComp-Teach list something I’m trying to do in my class this semester.  I had several suggestions to share it with others. It’s based on worked examples and peer instruction.

I’m teaching Python MediaComp, first time in 8 years on campus.  We have just shy of 300 students, and I have 155 in my lecture.  While I’m a big fan of worked examples, the way I’ve used them in small classes of 30-40 won’t work with 155.

Here’s what I’m doing this semester.  Every Thursday, I distribute a PDF with a bunch of code in sets, like this:

worked-examples-pic1

The students are getting 12-20 little programs every Thursday.  Most students type them ALL in before lecture Friday morning at 10 am.

Then on Friday, I put up PI-like questions like this:

Exercises4-5_pptxb

and

 

Exercises4-5_pptx

Students are required to work on these in groups.  I walk around the lecture hall and insist that nobody sit alone.  I get lots of questions in the five minutes when everybody’s working away.

We don’t have clickers, but I’ve given every student four colored index cards.  When I call for votes, everybody holds up the right colored card.

Here’s the interesting part — they TALK about the programs.  Here’s a question in Piazza with a student’s answer:

CS_1315__4_unread_

 

The other instructor in the class is also using these, and he says that the students are using them after the Friday lecture as examples to study from and to use in building homework.  I’ve had lots of comments about these from students, in office hours and via email.  They find them valuable to study.

My worked examples aren’t giving them much process.  I am getting them to look at lots of programs, type them in, get them running, and think about them.  I’m pretty excited about it.  Given that I haven’t been in this class in the last 8 years, the class isn’t really “mine” anymore.  I’m trying to be sensitive to how much I change about a huge machine (14 TA’s, two instructors…) that I’m only visiting in.  But everyone seems into this, and it’s fitting in pretty easily.

I have been uploading all of the PDF’s, PPTs, and PY’s  at http://home.cc.gatech.edu/mediaComp/95, if you’re interested.  (There are some weeks missing because Atlanta actually had some Winter this year.)

 

March 21, 2014 at 1:51 am 13 comments

To get Interest: Catch and Hold Attention

I’ve been thinking about this question a lot.  It’s informing my next round of research proposals.

We know more about how to retain students these days, the “hold” part of Dewey’s challenge mentioned below — consider the UCSD results and the MediaComp results.  But how do we “catch” attention?  We are particularly bad at “catching” the attention of women and minority students.  Our enrollment numbers are rising, but the percentage of women and under-represented minorities is not rising.  Betsy DiSalvo has demonstrated a successful “catch” and “hold” design with Glitch.  Can we do this reliably?  What are the participatory design processes that will help us create programs that “catch”?

So what can parents, teachers and leaders do to promote interest? The great educator John Dewey wrote that interest operates by a process of “catch” and “hold”—first the individual’s interest must be captured, and then it must be maintained. The approach required to catch a person’s interest is different from the one that’s necessary to hold a person’s interest: catching is all about seizing the attention and stimulating the imagination. Parents and educators can do this by exposing students to a wide variety of topics. It is true that different people find different things interesting—one reason to provide learners with a range of subject matter, in the hope that something will resonate.

via The Power Of Interest « Annie Murphy Paul.

December 18, 2013 at 1:04 am 3 comments

Success in Introductory Programming: What Works?

Leo Porter, Charlie McDowell, Beth Simon, and I collaborated on a paper on how to make introductory programming work, now available in CACM. It’s a shorter, more accessible version of Leo and Beth’s best-paper-award winning SIGCSE 2013 paper, with history and kibitzing from Charlie and me :

Many Communications readers have been in faculty meetings where we have reviewed and bemoaned statistics about how bad attrition is in our introductory programming courses for computer science majors (CS1). Failure rates of 30%–50% are not uncommon worldwide. There are usually as many suggestions for how to improve the course as there are faculty in the meeting. But do we know anything that really works?

We do, and we have research evidence to back it up. Pair programming, peer instruction, and media computation are three approaches to reforming CS1 that have shown positive, measurable impacts. Each of them is successful separately at improving retention or helping students learn, and combined, they have a dramatic effect.

via Success in Introductory Programming: What Works? | August 2013 | Communications of the ACM.

August 5, 2013 at 1:40 am 16 comments

UCSD’s overwhelming argument for Peer Instruction in CS Classes

For teachers in those old, stodgy, non-MOOC, face-to-face classes (“Does anybody even *do* that anymore?!?”), I strongly recommend using “Clickers” and Peer Instruction, especially based on these latest findings from Beth Simon and colleagues at the University of California at San Diego.  They have three papers to appear at SIGCSE 2013 about their multi-year experiment using Peer Instruction:

If we have such strong evidence that changing our pedagogy does work, are we doing our students a disservice if we do not use it?

January 15, 2013 at 6:00 am 13 comments

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