Posts tagged ‘Project Rise Up’

Announcing Barbara Ericson’s Defense on Effectiveness and Efficiency of Parsons Problems and Dynamically Adaptive Parsons Problems: Next stop, University of Michigan

Today, Barbara Ericson defends her dissertation. I usually do a blog post talking about the defending student’s work as I’ve blogged about it in the past, but that’s really hard with Barb.  I’ve written over 90 blog posts referencing Barb in the last 9 years.  That happens when we have been married for 32 years and collaborators on CS education work for some 15 years.

Barb did her dissertation on adaptive Parsons problems, but she could have done it on Project Rise Up or some deeper analysis of her years of AP CS analyses. She chose well. Her results are fantastic, and summarized below. (Yes, she does have six committee members, including two external members.)

Starting September 1, Barbara and I will be faculty at the University of Michigan. Barb will be an assistant professor in the University of Michigan School of Information (UMSI). I will be a professor in the Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) Division of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, jointly with their new Engineering Education Research program. Moving from Georgia Tech and Atlanta will be hard — all three of our children will still be here as we leave. We are excited about the opportunities and new colleagues that we will have in Ann Arbor.

Title: Evaluating the Effectiveness and Efficiency of Parsons Problems and Dynamically Adaptive Parsons Problems as a Type of Low Cognitive Load Practice Problem

Barbara J. Ericson

Human-Centered Computing

School of Interactive Computing

College of Computing

Georgia Institute of Technology

Date: Monday, March 12, 2018

Time: 12pm – 3pm

Location: TSRB 222

Committee:

Dr. Jim Foley (Advisor, School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology)

Dr. Amy Bruckman (School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology)

Dr. Ashok K. Goel (School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology)

Dr. Richard Catrambone (School of Psychology, Georgia Institute of Technology)

Dr. Alan Kay (Computer Science Department, University of California, Los Angeles)

Dr. Mitchel Resnick (Media Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

Abstract:

Learning to program can be difficult and time consuming.  Learners can spend hours trying to figure out why their program doesn’t compile or run correctly. Many countries, including the United States, want to train thousands of secondary teachers to teach programming.  However, busy in-service teachers do not have hours to waste on compiler errors or debugging.  They need a more efficient way to learn.

One way to reduce learning time is to use a completion task.  Parsons problems are a type of code completion problem in which the learner must place blocks of correct, but mixed up, code in the correct order. Parsons problems can also have distractor blocks, which are not needed in a correct solution.  Distractor blocks include common syntax errors like a missing colon on a for loop or semantic errors like the wrong condition on a loop.

In this dissertation, I conducted three studies to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of solving Parsons problems, fixing code, and writing code. (Editor’s note: I blogged on her first study here.) I also tested two forms of adaptation. For the second study, I added intra-problem adaptation, which dynamically makes the current problem easier.  For the last study, I added inter-problem adaptation which makes the next problem easier or harder depending on the learner’s performance.  The studies provided evidence that students can complete Parsons problems significantly faster than fixing or writing code while achieving the same learning gains from pretest to posttest.  The studies also provided evidence that adaptation helped more learners successfully solve Parsons problems.

These studies were the first to empirically test the efficiency and effectiveness of solving Parsons problems versus fixing and writing code.  They were also the first to explore the impact of both intra-problem and inter-problem adaptive Parsons problems.  Finding a more efficient and just as effective form of practice could reduce the frustration that many novices feel when learning programming and help prepare thousands of secondary teachers to teach introductory computing courses.

March 12, 2018 at 7:00 am 15 comments

SIGCSE 2018 Preview: Black Women in CS, Rise Up 4 CS, Community College to University CS, and Gestures for Learning CS

While I’m not going to be at this year’s SIGCSE, we’re going to have a bunch of us there presenting cool stuff.

On Wednesday, Barb Ericson is going to this exciting workshop, CS Education Infrastructure for All: Interoperability for Tools and Data Analytics, organized by Cliff Shaffer, Peter Brusilovsky, Ken Koedinger, and Stephen Edwards. Barb is eager to talk about her adaptive Parsons Problems and our ebook work.

My PhD student, Amber Solomon, is presenting at RESPECT 2018 (see program here) on a paper with Dekita Moon, Amisha Roberts, and Juan Gilbert, Not Just Black and Not Just a Woman: Black Women Belonging in Computing. They talk about how expectations of being Black in CS and expectations as a woman in CS come into conflict for the authors.

On Thursday, Barb is presenting her paper (with Tom McKlin) Helping Underrepresented Students Succeed in AP CSA and Beyond, which are the amazing results from the alumni study from her Project Rise Up effort to help underrepresented students succeed at Advanced Placement CS A. When Barb was deciding on her dissertation topic, she considered making Rise Up her dissertation topic, or adaptive Parsons problems. She decided on the latter, so you might think about this paper as the dissertation final chapter if she had made Rise Up her dissertation focus. Project Rise Up grew from Barb’s interest in AP CS A and her careful, annual analysis of success rates in AP CS A for various demographics (here is her analysis for 2017). It had a strong impact (and was surprisingly inexpensive), as seen in the follow-on statistics and the quotes from the students now years after Rise Up. I recommend going to the talk — she has more than could fit into the paper.

On Friday, my PhD student, Katie Cunningham, is presenting with her colleagues from California State University Monterey Bay and Hartnell College, Upward Mobility for Underrepresented Students: A Model for a Cohort-Based Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science.  The full author list is Sathya Narayanan, Katie, Sonia Arteaga, William J. Welch, Leslie Maxwell, Zechariah Chawinga, and Bude Su. They’re presenting the “CSin3” program which drew in students from traditionally underrepresented groups and helped them earn CS degrees with remarkable success: A three year graduation rate of 71%, compared to a 22% four-year graduation rate, as well as job offers from selective tech companies. The paper describes the features of the program that made it so successful, like its multi-faceted support outside the classroom, the partnership between a community college and a university, and keeping a cohort model. The paper has been recognized with a SIGCSE 2018 Best Paper Award in the Curricula, Programs, Degrees, and Position Papers track.

On Friday, my colleague Betsy DiSalvo is going to present at the NSF Showcase some of the great work that she and her student, Kayla des Portes, have been doing with Maker Oriented Learning for Undergraduate CS.

On Saturday, my EarSketch colleagues are presenting their paper: Authenticity and Personal Creativity: How EarSketch Affects Student Persistence with Tom McKlin, Brian Magerko, Taneisha Lee, Dana Wanzer, Doug Edwards, and Jason Freeman.

Also on Saturday, Amber with her undergraduate researchers, Vedant Pradeep and Sara Li, are presenting a poster which is also a data collection activity, so I hope that many of you will stop by. Their poster is The Role of Gestures in Learning Computer Science. They are interested in how gesture can help with CS learning and might be an important evaluation tool — students who understand their code, tend to gesture differently when describing their code than students who have less understanding. They want to show attendees what they’ve seen, but more importantly, they want feedback on the gestures they’ve observed “in the wild.” Have you seen these? Have you seen other gestures that might be interesting and useful to Amber and her team? What other kinds of gestures do you use when explaining CS concepts? Please come by and help inform them about the gestures you see when teaching and learning CS.

February 21, 2018 at 7:00 am 4 comments

Georgia Tech Receives CMD-IT University Award for Retention of Minorities and Students With Disabilities in Computer Science

I have not been directly involved in the computer science undergraduate major at Georgia Tech since “Georgia Computes!” started (and ECEP continued). Today, I teach graduate courses in the Human-Centered Computing PhD program and the undergraduate non-CS majors course Introduction to Media Computation, and only rarely teach CS undergraduates.

So, I am pleased that this award to the undergraduate program in the College of Computing mentioned things that Barb and I were part of.  The College of Computing won the award in part for Threads (I co-chaired the implementation committee), “Georgia Computes!” (which was mostly Barb and me), Project Rise Up 4 CS (which is Barb’s invention which she developed for ECEP), and our three mandatory CS classes, one of which is the Media Computation class I created. I feel like Barbara and I had a role in this.

The CMD-IT University Award decision was based on both Georgia Tech’s impressive quantitative reported results, which reflected high retention and graduation rates and qualitative reporting on their various retention program.  In particular, Georgia Tech highlighted the following four programs highlighted as directly impacting retention and graduation:

  • Threads Undergraduate Curriculum:  Students are given the opportunity to take control over their curriculum by choosing two of eight Threads to create their degree plan which gives them more than 28 different degree plans to follow. This resulted in students feeling they have more control and a better understanding of their degree plan.

  • Georgia Computes and Project Rise Up:  The two programs are spearheaded by Georgia Tech to help increase engagement in computing by broadening participation in computer science at all educational levels by underrepresented groups.  These programs increase interest in Computer Science.

  • Mandatory Introductions to Computer Science classes:  All students enrolled in Bachelor’s degree programs at Georgia Tech must take one of three computer science classes. The three programs enable students to take courses that fit their level of experience in Computer Science.

  • Travel Scholarships to Conference:  Georgia Tech provides between 40 and 120 travel scholarships to leading tech conferences with a diversity focus.  Students build networks of support and return with a feeling of renewed commitment to their degree program.

Source: Georgia Tech Receives CMD-IT University Award for Retention of Minorities and Students With Disabilities in Computer Science | Markets Insider

October 20, 2017 at 7:00 am Leave a comment


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