Archive for June 20, 2022

Programming in blocks lets far more people code — but not like software engineers: Response to the Ofsted Report

A May 2022 report from the UK government Research Review Series: Computing makes some strong claims about block-based programming that I think are misleading. The report is summarizing studies from the computing education research literature. Here’s the paragraph that I’m critiquing:

Block-based programming languages can be useful in teaching programming, as they reduce the need to memorise syntax and are easier to use. However, these languages can encourage pupils to develop certain programming habits that are not always helpful. For example, small-scale research from 2011 highlighted 2 habits that ‘are at odds with the accepted practice of computer science’ (footnote). The first is that these languages encourage a bottom-up approach to programming, which focuses on the blocks of the language and not wider algorithm design. The second is that they may lead to a fine-grained approach to programming that does not use accepted programming constructs; for example, pupils avoiding ‘the use of the most important structures: conditional execution and bounded loops’. This is problematic for pupils in the early stages of learning to program, as they may carry these habits across to other programming languages.

I completely agree with the first sentence — there are benefits to using block-based programming in terms of reducing the need to memorize syntax and increasing usability. There is also evidence that secondary school students learn computing better in block-based programming than in text-based programming (see blog post). Blanchard, Gardner-McCune, and Anthony found (a Best Paper awardee from SIGCSE 2020) that university students learned better when they used both blocks and text than when they used blocks alone.

The two critiques of block-based programming in the paragraph are:

  • “These languages encourage a bottom-up approach to programming, which focuses on the blocks of the language and not wider algorithm design.”
  • “They may lead to a fine-grained approach to programming that does not use accepted programming constructs…conditional execution and bounded loops.”

Key Point #1: Block-based programming doesn’t cause either of those critiques. What about programming with blocks rather than text could cause either of these to be true?

I’m programming a lot in Snap! these days for two new introductory computing courses I’m developing at the University of Michigan. I’ve been enjoying the experience. I don’t think that either of these critiques are true about my code or that of the students helping me develop the courses. I regularly do top-down programming where I define high-level custom blocks, as I design my program overall. Not only do I use conditional execution and bounded loops regularly, but Snap allows me to create new kinds of control structures, which has been a terrific help as I create block-based versions of our Teaspoon languages. My experience is only evidence that those two statements need not be true, just because the language is block-based.

I completely believe that the studies being cited in this research report saw and accurately describe exactly these points — that students worked bottom-up and that they rarely used conditioned execution and bounded loops. I’m not questioning the studies. I’m questioning the inference. I don’t believe at all that those are caused by block-based languages.

Key Point #2: Block-Based Programming is Scaffolding, but not Instant Expertise. For those not familiar, here are two education research terms that will be useful in making my argument.

  • Scaffolding is the support provided by a learner to enable them to achieve some task or process which they might not be able to achieve without that support. A kid can’t hop a fence by themselves, but they can with a boost — that’s a kind of scaffolding. Block-based programming languages are a kind of scaffolding (and here’s a nice paper from Weintrop and Wilensky describing how it is scaffolding — thanks to Ben Shapiro for pointing it out).
  • The Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) describes the difference between what a student can do on their own (one edge of the ZPD) and what they might be able to do with the support of a teacher or scaffolding (the far edge of the ZPD). Maybe you can’t code a linked list traversal on your own, but if I give you the pseudocode or give you a lecture on how to do it, then you can. But the far edge of ZPD is unlikely to be that you’re a data structure expert.

Let’s call the task that students were facing in the studies reviewed in the report: “Building a program using good design and with conditioned execution.” If we asked students to achieve this task in a text-based language, we would be asking them to perform the task without scaffolding. Here’s what I would expect:

  • Fewer students would complete the task. Not everyone can achieve the goal without scaffolding.
  • Those students who do complete the task likely already have a strong background in math or computing. They are probably more likely to use good design and to use conditioned execution. The average performance in the text-based condition would be higher than in the block-based condition — simply because you’ve filtered out everyone who doesn’t have the prior background..

Fewer people succeed. More people drop-out. Pretty common CS Ed result. If you just compare performance text vs. blocks, text looks better. For a full picture, you also have to look at who got left out.

So let’s go back to the actual studies. Why didn’t we see good design in students’ block-based programs? Because the far edge of the ZPD is not necessarily expert practice. Without scaffolding (block-based programming languages), many students are not able to succeed at all. Giving them the scaffolding doesn’t make them experts. The scaffolding can take them as far as the ZPD allows. It may take more learning experiences before we can get to good design and conditioned execution — if that even makes sense.

Key Point #3: Good software engineering practice is the wrong goal. Is “building a program using good design and with conditioned execution” really the task that students were engaging in? Is that what we want student to succeed at? Not everyone who learns to program is going to be a software engineer. (See the work I cite often on “alternative endpoints.”) Using good software engineering practices as the measure of success doesn’t make sense, as Ben Shapiro wrote about these kinds of studies several years ago on Twitter (see his commentary here, shared with his permission). A much more diverse audience of students are using block-based programming than ever used text-based programming. They are going to solve different problems for different purposes in different ways (a point I made in this blog post several years ago). Few US teachers in K-12 are taught how to teach good software engineering practice — that’s simply not their goal (a point that Aman Yadav made to me when discussing this post). We know from many empirical studies that most Scratch programs are telling a story. Why would you need algorithmic design and conditioned execution for that task? They’re not doing complicated coding, but the little bit of coding that they’re using is powerful and is engaging for students — and relatively few students are getting that. I’m far more concerned about the inequitable access to computing education than I am about whether students are becoming good software engineers.

Summary: It’s inaccurate to suggest that block-based programming causes bad programming habits. Block-based programming makes programming far more accessible than it ever has been before. Of course, we’re not going to see expert practice as used in text-based languages for traditional tasks. These are diverse novices using a different kind of notation for novel tasks. Let’s encourage the learning and engagement appropriate for each student.

June 20, 2022 at 7:00 am 12 comments


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 10,185 other followers

Feeds

Recent Posts

Blog Stats

  • 2,039,513 hits
June 2022
M T W T F S S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

CS Teaching Tips