Proposal #3 to Change CS Education to Reduce Inequity: Call a truce on academic misconduct cases for programming assignments

July 30, 2020 at 7:00 am 7 comments

I participated in a Black Lives Matter protest in Ann Arbor a few weeks ago, where I first heard the slogan “Defund the Police.” I was immediately uncomfortable. The current model for police in the US may be broken, but the function of the police is important. But the more I learned, the more I became more comfortable with the idea. As this NYTimes article suggests (see link here), the larger notion gaining support in the US is that we need a reinvestment. We want to spend less on catching criminals, and more on supporting community health and welfare. That’s when I realized what I wanted for my third and final proposal to change CS education to reduce inequity.

This is my four and last post in a series* about how we have to change how we teach CS education to reduce inequity. The series has several inspirations, but the concrete one that I want to reference back to each week is the statement from the University of Maryland’s CS department about improving diversity, equity, and inclusion within their department:

Creating a task force within the Education Committee for a full review of the computer science curriculum to ensure that classes are structured such that students starting out with less computing background can succeed, as well as reorienting the department teaching culture towards a growth mindset

Students don’t learn best by discovery

Paul Kirschner, John Sweller, and Richard Clark have been writing a series of controversial and influential papers in educational psychology. The most cited (in Educational Psychologist) lays out the whole premise in its title “Why minimal guidance during instruction does not work: An analysis of the failure of constructivist, discover, problem-based, experiential, and inquiry-based teaching” (see link here). Another, in American Educator, is a more accessible version “Putting students on the path to learning: The case for fully guided instruction” (see link here). A quick summary of the argument is that learning is hard, and it’s particularly hard to learn if you are trying to “figure things out” or “problem-solve” at the same time. In fact, it’s so hard that, unless you tell students exactly what you want them to learn, the majority of your students probably won’t learn it.

Computer scientists are big believers in discovery learning. I’ve had a senior faculty member in my department tell me that, if they gave students feedback from the unit tests (vs. a binary passed/failed) used in autograding, “we would be stealing from students the opportunity to figure it out for themselves.” I have been interviewing teaching assistants for the Fall. They tell me that if I made my class harder, so students have to struggle more to figure out the programming assignments, they would learn more and retain it longer. I know of little evidence for these beliefs, and none in CS education. Telling students leads to more students learning and learning more efficiently than making them figure it out. Efficiency in learning does matter, especially when we are talking about students who may have competing interests for their time (like a job) and during the stress of a pandemic.

Learning requires challenge, but too much cognitive load reduces learning. My guess is that we believe in the power of struggle because it’s how many of us learned computing. We struggled to figure out undocumented systems, to make things work, and to figure out why they worked. We come away with a rationalization that the process of discovery, without a teacher or guidance, is what led to our learning. The problem is that for experts and high-ability/highly-motivated learners, we like to learn that way. We want to figure it out for ourselves. There is a motivational (affective) value for discovery. However, the available evidence suggests that our belief in discovery is a mirage, a cognitive illusion, a trick we play on ourselves. We don’t learn best by discovery.

What’s worse, by forcing more students to learn by discovery, we will likely drive away the less prepared, the less motivated, and the less able students. That’s the point of this series of blog posts. We as CS teachers make decisions that often emphasize how we wanted to be taught and how our top students want to learn. That is inequitable. We need to teach “such that students starting out with less computing background can succeed.”

Programming assignments should be practice, not assessment

Clark, Kirschner, and Sweller describe how we should be teaching to be most effective and efficient:

Teachers providing explicit instructional guidance fully explain the concepts and skills that students are required to learn. Guidance can be provided through a variety of media, such as lectures, modeling, videos, computer-based presentations, and realistic demonstrations. It can also include class discussions and activities—if the teacher ensures that through the discussion or activity, the relevant information is explicitly provided and practiced. In a math class, for example, when teaching students how to solve a new type of problem, the teacher may begin by showing students how to solve the problem and fully explaining the how and why of the mathematics involved. Often, in following problems, step-by-step explanations may gradually be faded or withdrawn until, through practice and feedback, the students can solve the problem themselves. In this way, before trying to solve the problem on their own, students would already have been walked through both the procedure and the concepts behind the procedure.

Programming assignments are the opportunities to practice in this model, not the time to “figure it out for themselves” and not the time to assess learning or performance. In explicit instruction in programming, the teacher tells the student exactly what to do to solve a programming problem. Tell them how to solve the problem, and let them practice the same problem. (Better yet, give students worked examples and practice interleaved, as we do in our ebooks.) Programming is a great place for learning, since it provides feedback on our tests and hypotheses.

Students should be encouraged to engage in programming practice. The way we do that is by giving points towards grades. We should probably give more points for correct solutions, because that creates desirable incentives. But being able to program does not indicate understanding. The recent ITiCSE 2020 paper by Jean Sala and Diana Franklin showed that use of a given code construct was not correlated well with understanding of that code construct (see paper here). It’s also the case that students may understand the concept but can’t make it work in code.

As I was writing this blog post, the ACM SIGCSE-Members email list had a (yet another!) great thread on how to reduce cheating in CS1. The teachers on the list were torn. They want to support student learning, but they don’t want to reward cheaters. Many echoed this same point — that programming assignments have to be an opportunity for learning, not a summative assessment.

We need to separate learning and assessment activities. Most programming should be a learning opportunity, and not a time to assess student learning. I suppose we might have a special programming assignment labelled, “This one is under exam conditions,” and then it’s clear that it should be done alone and for assessment. I don’t encourage trying to make those kinds of distinctions during remote teaching and learning. I completely understand the reason for plagiarism detecting and prosecution on exams and quizzes. Those are assessment activities, not learning activities.

We should evaluate the students’ programs and give them feedback on them. Feedback improves learning. It shouldn’t be about punishing students who struggle with or even fail at the programs — programming should be part of a learning process.

We can assess learning about programming without having students program

One of our biggest myths in computer science is that the only way to test students’ knowledge of programming is by having them program. Allison Elliott Tew showed that her FCS1 correlated highly with the final exam scores of the students from four courses at two universities who were part of her study (see post here, with diagram of this scatterplot). Her test (all multiple choice) was predicted the grade of the semester’s worth of programming assignments, quizzes, and tests.

Over the years, I’ve attended several AP CS presentations from psyshometricians from ETS. Every time, they show us that they don’t need students to program on the AP CS exams. They can completely predict performance on the programming questions from the multiple choice questions. We can measure the knowledge and skill of programming without having students program.

Of course, it’s easier to tell the students to program, as a way of testing their programming knowledge. However, it’s not an effective measurement instrument (understanding and coding ability are not equivalent), it’s inefficient (takes more time than a test), and it creates stress and cognitive load on the students. (I recommend the work by Kinnunen and Simon on how intro programming assignments depress students’ self-efficacy.) We can and should build better assessments. For example, we could use Parsons problems which are more sensitive measures of understanding about programming than writing programs (see blog post). We want students to program, and most of our students want to program. Our focus should be on improving programming as a learning activity, not as a form of assessment.

Now more than ever, encourage collaboration

Here’s the big ask, Stop prosecuting students for academic misconduct if you detect plagiarism on programming assignments. My argument is just like the policing argument — we should be less worried about catching those who will exploit the opportunity to get unearned points, and more worried about discouraging students from collaboration that will help them learn. We already have inequality in our classrooms. During the pandemic, the gap between the most and less prepared students will likely grow. We have to take specific actions to close that gap and always in favor of the less-prepared students.

Notice that I did not say “stop trying to detect plagiarism.” We should use tools like MOSS to look for potential cheating. But let’s use any detection of plagiarism as an opportunity to learn, and maybe, as a cry for help.

Why do students cheat on programming assignments? There’s a body of literature on that question, but let me jump to the critical insight for this moment in time: All those reasons will be worse this year.

  • When we ask students to program, we are saying, “I have shown you all that you need to be able to complete this program. I now want you to demonstrate that you can.” Are we sure about that first part? We’re going to be doing everything online. We might miss covering concepts that we might normally teach, maybe in side conversations. How would we know if we got it wrong this next year?
  • One of the most powerful enablers for cheating is that students feel anonymous. If students feel that nobody knows them or notices them, then they might as well cheat. Students are going to feel even more anonymous in remote teaching.
  • Finally, at both higher education institutions where I’ve taught, the policy term for cheating is “illicit collaboration.” Especially now in a pandemic with remote teaching, we want students to collaborate. The evidence on pair programming and buddy programming is terrific — it helps with learning, motivation, and persistence in CS. But where’s the line between allowed and illicit collaboration when it’s all over Zoom? I’m worried about students not collaborating because they fear that they’ll cross that line. I have talked to students who won’t collaborate because they fear accidentally doing something disallowed. It will be even harder for students to see that line in a pandemic.

Some students cheat because they think that they have to. “If I don’t cheat and everyone else does, I’m at a disadvantage.” That’s only true if student grades are comparative. That’s why Proposal #2 is a critical step for Proposal #3 — stop pre-allocating, curving, or rationing grades. Use grades to reward learning, not “rising above your peers.”

I worry about us encouraging cheating. The pressures that Feldman identifies as exacerbating cheating will be even greater in all-online learning:

For example, we lament our students’ rampant cheating and copying of homework. Yet when we take a no-excuses approach to late work in the name of preparing students for real-world skills and subtract points or even refuse to accept the work, we incentivize students to complete work on time by hook or by crook and disincentivize real learning. Some common grading practices encourage the very behaviors we want to stop.

Feldman, Joe. Grading for Equity (p. xxii). SAGE Publications. Kindle Edition.

If you detect plagiarism, contact the student. Tell them what you found. Ask them what happened. Ask how they’re doing. Are they getting lost in the class? Use this as an opportunity to explain what illicit collaboration is. Use this as an opportunity to figure out how you’re teaching and what’s going on in the lives of your students. This will be most effective for your first-generation students and your students who are in a minority group. They would likely feel alone, isolated, and invisible even in the in-person class. It’s going to be worse in remote teaching. They are less likely to reach out for help in office hours. Let them know that you’re there and that you care.

Last year, I was in charge of “cheat finding” for a large (over 750 students) introductory programming course. In the end, we filed academic misconduct accusations for about 10% of the class (not all of whom were found guilty by the Honor Council). It was a laborious, time-consuming task — gathering evidence, discussing with the instructional team, writing up the cases, etc. We should have spent that time talking to those students. We would have learned more. They would have learned more. It would have been a better experience for everyone.

Let’s change CS teaching from being about policing over plagiarism, to being about student health, welfare, and development.


* This will be last post for awhile. I’m taking a hiatus from blogging. This series on CS teaching to reduce inequity is my “going out with a bang.”

Entry filed under: Uncategorized. Tags: , , , , .

Proposal #2 to Change CS Education to Reduce Inequity: Make the highest grades achievable by all students Let’s program in social studies classes: NSF funding for our work in task-specific programming languages

7 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Tom Morley  |  July 30, 2020 at 7:56 am

    I was chair of the Honor Committee when the huge pile of CS program cheating cases came through. There were literally dozens of them. The committee actually found for the students in about 1/2 the cases, because the department had done such a bad job of explaining what collaboration was permitted and what was not.

    Reply
  • 2. Bruce Conrad  |  July 30, 2020 at 10:58 am

    Love the “program cheering” idea. Let’s celebrate our students’ success in getting some code to work.

    Reply
  • 3. Kurt Eiselt  |  July 30, 2020 at 1:11 pm

    I recall a huge cheating kerfuffle (maybe the same one Tom is talking about) where one outcome was to allow CS1 students to collaborate without penalty. Some folks were sure this move would lead to the decline and fall of civilization as we knew it. Or at least that we would all pay the price in CS2. But there was no noticeable downstream impact, and companies still hired our graduates enthusiastically. After years of programming assignments being treated as take-home exams (and building an infrastructure to discover those students who would go astray), we separated learning opportunities in CS1 from assessment events and we all survived quite nicely. Perhaps it is time to defund the cheating police.

    Reply
    • 4. Mark Guzdial  |  July 30, 2020 at 1:19 pm

      EXACTLY! I thought about exactly that story as I was writing this blog post, Kurt.

      Reply
  • 5. Bryn Jeffries  |  July 30, 2020 at 7:44 pm

    I found some great insights into the motivation of students to plagiarise (or ask others for answers) in this open letter: https://www.reddit.com/r/RPI/comments/h98dc9/letter_to_faculty_regarding_use_of_chegg_and/
    It points to deficiencies in the material and teaching provided, as well as the pedagogical value of being provided a (timely) answer. One concern I have over a completely permissive approach is that students may not appreciate the need to eschew such resources in summative assessments, particularly now that online exams at home make increase the opportunities for cheating. So ideally some middle ground should be found to educate students early on.

    Reply
    • 6. Steve Tate  |  July 31, 2020 at 9:40 am

      Wow – that’s an eye-opening letter and reddit discussion. I definitely struggle with the “cheating on homework” issue, and have tried a ton of different class structures to try to deal with this. At one extreme, I’ve treated homeworks as just completion/effort grades, going over solutions carefully in class and emphasizing that they were learning activities and not assessment. The whole point was to prepare for exams, which were in a controlled environment and served as the assessment. Taken to extremes this could be like some non-US university models, where your grade is basically your final exam. Talk about high stakes!

      But even if something like that model makes sense in normal times, COVID and forced remote learning “make everything different.” The “controlled environment” for assessment no longer exists. And I don’t have the bandwidth to do individual open-ended projects, as much as I think that’s a great idea. I look in jealous awe at places like Berkeley that have 20 PhD-student TAs for a single course, while I’m lucky to have half or even a third of a single MS-student TA’s assignment. Any in-depth evaluation and feedback on individual projects would have to come from me.

      Al Aho had this great design for the Compilers class at Columbia, where each student designed their own domain-specific language to make a compiler for it. So you get dozens of different languages and dozens of different approaches, and everyone is doing something unique (no copying!) and that they care about. That’s awesome. And totally unworkable here.

      Reply
  • 7. Haris Skiadas  |  August 11, 2020 at 11:12 pm

    Mark, your blog posts have been such an inspiration and a call to arms, and they constantly make me question the way I teach. You have my deepest thanks. I hope you resume blogging soon. It’s a remarkable and extremely valuable service to the community.

    Reply

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